Topic: How does the prostate cancer microenvironment affect the metastatic process and/or treatment outcome?

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A special issue of Journal of Cancer Metastasis and Treatment  (Print ISSN:2394-4722; Online ISSN:2454-2857).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 Dec 2017

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Guest Editor(s)

  • Klaus Pors, BEng, PhD, MRSC
    Senior Lecturer in Chemical Biology, Coordinator of External Undergraduate Research Training Placements, Institute of Cancer Therapeutics, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, BD7 1DP, UK.

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  • Dr. Jason P. Webber, PhD
    Division of Cancer and Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Velindre Cancer Centre, Whitchurch, Cardiff CF14 2TL, UK.

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Submission Information:

Articles of special issue are free of charge for article processing.
For Author Instructions, please refer to http://jcmtjournal.com/pages/view/author_instructions
For Online Submission, please login at https://mc03.manuscriptcentral.com/jcmt
Submission Deadline: 31 Dec 2017
Contacts: Carrie Wang, Managing Editor, editor001@jcmtjournal.com

Published Articles Download All Articles
  • Current challenges and opportunities in treating hypoxic prostate tumors

    Declan J. McKenna , Rachel Errington , Klaus Pors
    Hypoxia is a well-established characteristic of prostate tumors and is now recognised as a major contributory factor to both tumor progression and increased resistance to therapy. One strategy to target hypoxic tumor cells is the development of hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs), which are activated in low oxygen environments. Several HAPs have been developed but despite encouraging results from preclinical studies many of these have performed disappointingly in clinical trials. In the developing era of precision medicine, it is clear that more strategic deployment of these agents is... Read more
    This article belongs to the Special Issue How does the prostate cancer microenvironment affect the metastatic process and/or treatment outcome?
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2018;4:11. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.54
    Published on: 1 Mar 2018  | Viewed:1950  | Downloaded:194
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  • Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases: expression, roles in metastatic prostate cancer progression and opportunities for drug targeting

    Robert A. Falconer , Paul M. Loadman
    The membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs), an important subgroup of the wider MMP family, demonstrate widespread expression in multiple tumor types, and play key roles in cancer growth, migration, invasion and metastasis. Despite a large body of published research, relatively little information exists regarding evidence for MT-MMP expression and function in metastatic prostate cancer. This review provides an appraisal of the literature describing gene and protein expression in prostate cancer cells and clinical tissue, summarises the evidence for roles in prostate cancer... Read more
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2017;3:315-27. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.40
    Published on: 12 Dec 2017  | Viewed:2003  | Downloaded:119
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  • Androgen-AR axis in primary and metastatic prostate cancer: chasing steroidogenic enzymes for therapeutic intervention

    Agnese C. Pippione , Donatella Boschi , Klaus Pors , Simonetta Oliaro-Bosso , Marco L. Lolli
    Androgens play an important role in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Although androgen deprivation therapy remains the front-line treatment for advanced prostate cancer, patients eventually relapse with the lethal form of the disease. The prostate tumor microenvironment is characterised by elevated tissue androgens that are capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR). Inhibiting the steroidogenic enzymes that play vital roles in the biosynthesis of testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) seems to be an attractive strategy for PCa therapies. Emerging data... Read more
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2017;3:328-61. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.44
    Published on: 12 Dec 2017  | Viewed:4653  | Downloaded:110
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  • HOX transcription factors and the prostate tumor microenvironment

    Richard Morgan , Hardev S. Pandha
    It is now well established that the tumor microenvironment plays an essential role in the survival, growth, invasion, and spread of cancer through the regulation of angiogenesis and localized immune responses. This review examines the role of the HOX genes, which encode a family of homeodomain-containing transcription factors, in the interaction between prostate tumors and their microenvironment. Previous studies have established that HOX genes have an important function in prostate cancer cell survival in vitro and in vivo, but there is also evidence that HOX proteins regulate the... Read more
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2017;3:278-87. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.31
    Published on: 6 Dec 2017  | Viewed:1547  | Downloaded:88
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  • Prostate cancer exosomes as modulators of the tumor microenvironment

    Alex P. Shephard , Vincent Yeung , Aled Clayton , Jason P. Webber
    Researchers are currently trying to understand why some men with prostate cancer go on to develop aggressive disease whilst others maintain slow growing tumors. Although endogenous genetic anomalies within the tumor cell are important, the prevailing view is that the tissue microenvironment as a whole is the determinant factor. Many studies have focussed on the role of soluble factors in modulating the nature of the tumor microenvironment. There is however a growing interest in the role of extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, as regulators of disease progression. A variety of... Read more
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2017;3:288-301. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.32
    Published on: 6 Dec 2017  | Viewed:4266  | Downloaded:268
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  • Tumor heterogeneity and therapy resistance - implications for future treatments of prostate cancer

    Fiona M. Frame , Amanda R. Noble , Sandra Klein , Hannah F. Walker , Rakesh Suman , Richard Kasprowicz , Vin M. Mann , Matt S. Simms , Norman J. Maitland
    Aim: To develop new therapies for prostate cancer, disease heterogeneity must be addressed. This includes patient variation, multi-focal disease, cellular heterogeneity, genomic changes and epigenetic modification. This requires more representative models to be used in more innovative ways. Methods: This study used a panel of cell lines and primary prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from patient tissue. Several assays were used; alamar blue, colony forming assays, γH2AX and Ki67 immunofluorescence and comet assays. Ptychographic quantitative phase imaging (QPI), a label-free imaging... Read more
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2017;3:302-14. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.34
    Published on: 6 Dec 2017  | Viewed:4123  | Downloaded:296
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  • Getting closer to prostate cancer in patients - what scientists should want from clinicians

    Norman J. Maitland
    For scientists pursuing drug development for prostate cancer, it is critical that an appropriate ex vivo or in vitro model system is available for study. Cancer research has generally consisted of: (1) finding the means to arrest fast growing cancer cells; or (2) (as a compromise) to slow down the excessive rate of cell growth; or in the best case (3) to kill the cancer cells whilst sparing the surrounding normal tissues. As the knowledge of the biological nature of the cancer cell improves, it has become increasingly apparent that such a simplistic attitude to cancer therapy development or... Read more
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2017;3:262-70. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.23
    Published on: 17 Nov 2017  | Viewed:1290  | Downloaded:80
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  • Getting better at treating prostate cancer: what clinicians should want from scientists

    Malcolm Mason
    If the treatment landscape for prostate cancer is to be transformed, clinicians and scientists must work together ever more closely. Prostate cancer defeats physicians when patients are not accurately stratified according to patients’ risk of dying of disease, when the effects of tumor heterogeneity are insufficiently understood, and when attempts at therapy by clinicians spur further disease evolution and the emergence of new resistance mechanisms. At the same time, clinicians’ over-treat men who in reality do not need it, and some of those men needlessly suffer long term side effects as a... Read more
    J Cancer Metastasis Treat 2017;3:271-7. | doi:10.20517/2394-4722.2017.51
    Published on: 17 Nov 2017  | Viewed:1254  | Downloaded:78
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Journal of Cancer Metastasis and Treatment ISSN 2454-2857 (Online), ISSN 2394-4722 (Print)
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